XIX International AIDS Conference


MOAC01 Health Disparities and the U.S. MSM HIV Epidemic
  Oral Abstract Session : Track C
Venue: Session Room 3
Time: 23.07.2012, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Chairs: Kevin Fenton, United States
Darrell Wheeler, United States
 
 
Webcast provided by The Kaiser Family Foundation

11:00
MOAC0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Trends in HIV prevalence and HIV testing among young MSM: five United States cities, 1994-2008
A. Oster, C. Johnson, B. Le, T. Finlayson, A. Balaji, A. Lansky, J. Mermin, L. Valleroy, D. MacKellar, S. Behel, G. Paz-Bailey, YMS and NHBS Study Groups
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Atlanta, United States
A. Oster, United States

11:13
MOAC0101
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Equal behaviors, unequal risks: the role of partner transmission potential in racial HIV disparities among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US
E. Rosenberg1, C. Kelley2, B. O'Hara1, P. Frew2, J. Peterson3, T. Sanchez1, C. del Rio4, P. Sullivan1
1Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Epidemiology, Atlanta, United States, 2Emory University School of Medicine, Infectious Diseases, Atlanta, United States, 3Georgia State University, Psychology, Atlanta, United States, 4Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Global Health, Atlanta, United States
E. Rosenberg, United States

11:26
MOAC0105
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
An evolving concentrated epidemic: comparison of socioeconomic, behavioural and biological factors among newly diagnosed, previously diagnosed and HIV-negative black men who have sex with men in six US cities (HPTN 061)
K. Mayer1, L. Wang2, B. Koblin3, C. Mao2, S. Mannheimer4, M. Magnus5, C. del Rio6, S. Buchbinder7, L. Wilton8, V. Cummings9, C. Watson5, S. Griffith10, D. Wheeler11, HPTN 061 Protocol Team
1The Fenway Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States, 2Statistical Center for HIV/AIDS Research & Prevention (SCHARP), Seattle, United States, 3New York Blood Center, New York, United States, 4Harlem Hospital / Columbia University, Department of Medicine/Mailman School of Public Health, New York, United States, 5The George Washington University, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Washington, United States, 6Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Atlanta, United States, 7San Francisco Department of Health, HIV Research Division, San Francisco, United States, 8Binghamton University, Department of Human Development, Binghamton, United States, 9Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Pathology Department, Baltimore, United States, 10FHI 360, Durham, United States, 11HPTN 061 Protocol Team, New York, United States
K. Mayer, United States

11:39
MOAC0106
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Correlates of HIV incidence among black men who have sex with men in 6 U.S. cities (HPTN 061)
B. Koblin1, K. Mayer2, S. Eshleman3, L. Wang4, S. Shoptaw5, C. del Rio6, S. Buchbinder7, M. Magnus8, S. Mannheimer9,10, T.-Y. Liu4, V. Cummings3, E. Piwowar-Manning3, S. Fields11, S. Griffith12, V. Elharrar13, D. Wheeler14, HPTN 061 Study Team
1New York Blood Center, Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention, New York, United States, 2Fenway Health and Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Boston, United States, 3Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Baltimore, United States, 4Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Seattle, United States, 5University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Family Medicine, Los Angeles, United States, 6Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Global Health, Atlanta, United States, 7San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, United States, 8George Washington University, School of Public Health and Health Services, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Washington DC, United States, 9Harlem Hospital/ Columbia University, Department of Medicine, New York, United States, 10Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, New York, United States, 11Florida International University-College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Miami, United States, 12FHI 360, Research Triangle Park, United States, 13NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Clinical Prevention Research Branch, Bethesda, United States, 14Loyola University Chicago, Graduate School of Social Work, Chicago, United States
B. Koblin, United States

11:52
MOAC0103
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Foreign location of birth and time since immigration are associated with HIV status among Latino MSM in the United States
A. Oster1, K. Russell1, R. Wiegand1, B. Le1, E. Valverde1, D. Forrest2, M. Cribbin1, G. Paz-Bailey1, NHBS Study Group
1Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, Atlanta, United States, 2University of Miami, Miami, United States
A. Oster, United States

12:05
MOAC0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Racial disparities in antiretroviral therapy use and viral suppression among sexually active HIV-positive men who have sex with men receiving medical care: United States, Medical Monitoring Project, 2009 data collection cycle
L. Beer, A. Oster, C. Mattson, J. Skarbinski
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, United States
L. Beer, United States

Powerpoints presentations
Trends in HIV prevalence and HIV testing among young MSM: five United States cities, 1994-2008 - Alexandra Oster

Equal behaviors, unequal risks: the role of partner transmission potential in racial HIV disparities among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the US - Eli Rosenberg

An evolving concentrated epidemic: comparison of socioeconomic, behavioural and biological factors among newly diagnosed, previously diagnosed and HIV-negative black men who have sex with men in six US cities (HPTN 061) - Kenneth Mayer

Correlates of HIV incidence among black men who have sex with men in 6 U.S. cities (HPTN 061) - Beryl Koblin

Foreign location of birth and time since immigration are associated with HIV status among Latino MSM in the United States - Alexandra Oster

Racial disparities in antiretroviral therapy use and viral suppression among sexually active HIV-positive men who have sex with men receiving medical care: United States, Medical Monitoring Project, 2009 data collection cycle - Linda Beer



Rapporteur report

Track C report by Albert Liu


Emerging data on HIV health disparities among US MSM was presented in this session.

Trends in HIV prevalence and HIV testing among young MSM in 5 US cities were evaluated from 1994 to 2008 in the Young Men’s Survey and the National Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS).  HIV prevalence was high in young MSM; prevalence was stable among 18-22 year old MSM but increased among 23-29 year MSM (p=0.07).  Recent HIV testing increased substantially in both age groups (p<0.0001). 

Researchers from Atlanta proposed use of the Transmission Potential Prevalence (TPP) as a measure of transmission risk in different subgroups [TPP = proportion of individuals in a population with VL ≥400].   In a cohort study of 709 Black and White MSM in Atlanta, TPP was significantly higher in Black vs. White MSM (25% vs. 8%, p<0.0001), despite similar community/population viral load.   While Black and White MSM reported similar behavioral risk, the probability of having a partner with HIV transmission potential was higher for Black vs. White MSM (39% vs. 18%, for 2 UAI partners).

In HPTN 061, factors associated with baseline HIV-serostatus were evaluated among black MSM (BMSM) in 6 US cities.   Overall, 12% were newly diagnosed HIV-positive at enrollment.  HIV-positive BMSM were older and more likely to be unemployed, have a lower income, report recent URAI, and have an STI, compared with HIV-uninfected BMSM.  Overall HIV incidence in this cohort was 2.8% per year, and was 5.9% per year among those ≤30 years of age.  Targeted, tailored, and culturally appropriate combination HIV prevention strategies are urgently needed for this population.

Latino MSM are also disproportionately affected by HIV.  HIV infection was more prevalent among U.S.-born and foreign-born Latino MSM who immigrated >5 years ago in NHBS, compared with those who were foreign-born and immigrated ≤5 years ago, suggesting a critical window of opportunity for HIV prevention in this population.

The Medical Monitoring Project compared sexual behavior, ART use, and viral suppression in Black and White MSM in 2009-2010.  While there was no racial disparity in sexual risk behaviors,  BMSM were significantly less likely than white MSM to report ART use (80% vs. 91%) and have durable viral suppression (51% vs. 73%).

An important theme across several presentations was the importance of addressing structural, behavioral, and biological factors, and the need to increase HIV testing, linkage to care, and ART use/viral suppression in these heavily impacted populations.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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