XIX International AIDS Conference


WESA07 Key Populations in Sub Saharan Africa: A SAHARA Journal Special Edition
  Non-Commercial Satellite
Venue: Mini Room 8
Time: 25.07.2012, 07:00 - 08:30
Co-Chairs: Stefan Baral, United States
Nancy Phaswana-Mafuya, South Africa
Organiser: Social Aspects of HIV/AIDS Research Alliance (SAHARA), Human Sciences Research Council, Center for Public Health and Human Rights, and Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
 
 
The last five years have seen an emergence of data exploring HIV risk status among key populations demonstrating consistently high HIV burdens. Little is known about the role of key populations in HIV in the African context, though there is an emerging evidence base demonstrating high-risk status. This satellite session will provide an overview of the evolving understanding of the epidemiology of HIV among key populations and its role within the African context; human rights and HIV among key populations; multilateral funding structures; research and prevention for key populations in Africa; and new prevention technologies for populations and homosexuality policies.

07:00
Opening Remarks


N. Phaswana-Mafuya, South Africa

07:05
People who use Drugs in Africa


J. Mbwambo, United Republic of Tanzania

07:12
Human Rights and HIV among Key Populations in the African Context


C. Byrer, United States

07:20

Powerpoint
International Donor Funding for Most At Risk Populations in Africa: A Review


O. Ryan, United States

07:27
New Prevention Technologies and the Relevance to Men who have sex with Men in African Epidemics


K. Rebe, South Africa

07:35

Powerpoint
Anti-Homosexuality Legislation: Public Health Aspects on HIV Prevention, Treatment,Care in Uganda


P. Semugoma, Uganda

07:43

Powerpoint
Men who have sex with Men in Africa


N. Muraguri, Kenya

07:50

Powerpoint
Moderated Discussion


S. Baral, United States

Powerpoints presentations
International Donor Funding for Most At Risk Populations in Africa: A Review - Owen Ryan

Anti-Homosexuality Legislation: Public Health Aspects on HIV Prevention, Treatment,Care in Uganda - Paul Semugoma

Men who have sex with Men in Africa - Nicolas Muraguri

Moderated Discussion - Stefan Baral



Rapporteur report

Track D report by Tirelo Modie-Moroka


Key Populations in Sub Saharan Africa: A SAHARA Journal Special Edition

 Data exploring HIV risk status among key populations demonstrates consistent high HIV burdens in Sub Saharan Africa, yet little is known about the role played by key populations. This session provided an overview of the evolving understanding of the epidemiology of HIV among key populations and its role within the African context; human rights and HIV among key populations; multilateral funding structures; research and prevention for key populations in Africa; and new prevention technologies for populations and homosexuality policies. These populations carry  a disproportionate burden of HIV.

Three universal key affected populations are Sex workers (SW), gay men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) and People who use drugs (PUD). In many countries in SSA, there is criminalization of key populations, significant Social Stigma which put these populations at risk for HIV. Due to mandatory reporting of sex work, MSM and drug users, decreasing social capital and criminalization of services, health care professionals and harsh penalties from the justice system, there is general lack of access to and underutilization of health care services.  Panelists further indicated the ripple effects of stigma and discrimination in ethical clearance of studies related to sex work, MSM and drug users.

 Recommendations included using a human rights based approaches for inclusion of key populations in health care services; decriminalizing sex work, MSM and drug use, screening of refugee populations, promotion of research on key populations and developing targeted prevention, treatment and care services for key populations. One emerging theme was greater involvement of key populations and developing partnerships and synergy with prevention services targeting women and children rather than working in competition with one another. The session also emphasized the need to stimulate funding for joint work on HIV among key populations.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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