XIX International AIDS Conference


WESA13 HIV and Aging: The Challenge of the Epidemic's Fourth Decade
  Non-Commercial Satellite
Venue: Session Room 7
Time: 25.07.2012, 18:30 - 20:30
Co-Chairs: Andrew D. Ball, Afghanistan
Naisiadet Mason, Kenya
Organiser: AIDS Community Research Initiative of America (ACRIA), Terrence Higgins Trust, HelpAge International, Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), and Women Fighting AIDS in Kenya (WOFAK)
 
 
Millions now have access to effective treatments that have increased life expectancy. With ever-increasing new infections, 50% of all persons with HIV in developed nations will be age 50 or older as early as 2015, and the trend holds elsewhere (3 million in sub-Saharan Africa alone). At early ages (50-65) many have multiple chronic conditions typically associated with advanced age. Many are also socially isolated, have high rates of depression, and contend with financial insecurity, ageism, and stigma. This multimorbidity requires a different approach to the delivery of care and services, and support from informal caregivers and the community.
Global experts will cover epidemiology, prevention, and care in the context of multimorbidity and caregiving challenges; a global panel of older adults with HIV will respond, including appropriate policy actions.
Co-chairs: Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall (invited), WHO HIV Director; and Naisadet Mason, Kenyan activist and older adult with HIV.

18:30

Powerpoint
Opening remarks by Co-Chairs


A. Ball, Afghanistan
N. Mason, Kenya

18:40

Powerpoint
Global epidemiology and demographics of the epidemic among older adults


J. Negin, Australia

18:50

Powerpoint
Multimorbidity management & the critical role of caregivers


S. Karpiak, United States
M. Brennan-Ing, United States

19:05

Powerpoint
Prevention for older adults


K. Fenton, United States

19:15

Powerpoint
Policy and advocacy strategies


L. Power, United Kingdom

19:25
Responses from a Panel of Older (50+) PLHIV Community Activists


R. Jimenez, Ecuador
C. Massey, United States
R. Waryaro, Uganda
J. Rock, Australia

19:55
Question and answer Session



20:25
Closing remarks


A. Ball, Afghanistan
N. Mason, Kenya

Powerpoints presentations
Opening remarks by Co-Chairs -

Global epidemiology and demographics of the epidemic among older adults - Joel Negin

Multimorbidity management & the critical role of caregivers -

Prevention for older adults - Kevin Fenton

Policy and advocacy strategies - Lisa Power



Rapporteur report

Track B report by Dr. Federico Pulido


WESA13.  Non-Commercial Satellite. HIV and Aging: The Challenge of the Epidemic's Fourth Decade

With the increase of life expectancy due to the progressive improvement in management and treatment of the HIV infection, the number of infected people more than 50 years old is quickly increasing. It is expected that 50% of all persons with HIV in developed nations will be age 50 or older as early as 2015. And in this new scenario, multiple chronic conditions typically associated with advanced age will be coexisting with the HIV related complications.

Andrew D. Ball, from Afghanistan, and Naisiadet Mason, from Kenya, were the co-chairs of this interesting session and introduced the problem of aging and multimorbidity.

J. Negin, Australia made a review of the global epidemiology and demographics of the epidemic among older adults. He remarked that the increasing number of people living with HIV aged more than 50 is not only the results of longer survival due to treatment as older adults accounted for 12-15% of new cases of HIV in the US and Europe. Also in Sub-Saharan Africa and other regions of the world patients aged more than 50 represent 12-14% of the total HIV aged more than 15, but this reality is often invisible.  New challenges are emerging, as understand sexuality in older adults.

S. Karpiak and M. Brennan-Ing, from United States, described the challenges of multimorbidity management and caregiving. Many age-associated disease are more common in treated HIV patients than in age-matched uninfected persons, and that occur as a result of multiple increased risks (not only HIV and ages, but also ART, life style, substance use, co-infections,…). They presented a recent guideline for clinicians managing older patients with HIV infection, published by the American Association of HIV Medicine and reinforced the role of social network in caregiving these patients.

K. Fenton, from CDC, talked about the prevention challenges, and ways to improve care and treatment of older adults with HIV. He concluded that there is a need for additional models of effective prevention, treatment and care programs for older adults, and there is a need to raise awareness among older persons as well as their general practitioners about HIV.

To close presentations, Lisa Power made policy and advocacy considerations for an ageing population of people with HIV. She concluded that UNAIDS and WHO should include 50+ in their reporting, training in HIV is necessary for older people’s services (and vice versa), the care for common comorbidities have to be integrated with the care for HIV infection, peer support and leadership have to be developed and finally, remarked that it is necessary listen to older people!, so discussion was driven by a panel of people working in this topic in Ecuador, US, Uganda and Australia.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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