XIX International AIDS Conference


WEAE03 Will Mobile Technology 'Do It'?
  Oral Abstract Session : Track E
Venue: Session Room 7
Time: 25.07.2012, 16:30 - 18:00
Co-Chairs: Jean B. Nachega, United States
Edward Mills, United States
 
 

16:30
WEAE0301
Abstract
Powerpoint
The distribution and use of cell phones to mothers of HIV-positive infants identified by the Haiti National Early Infant Diagnosis of HIV program (EID): a model for increasing adherence?
N. Segaren1, T. Lewis1, O. Desinor2, E. Simeon1, N. Segaren3
1Caris Foundation, Port au Prince, Haiti, 2USAID, PAP, Haiti, 3Chelsea & Westminster Hospital, London, United Kingdom
N. Segaren, Haiti

16:45
WEAE0302
Abstract
Monthly monitoring at a small NGO: mobile phones versus paper
K. Regan1,2, D. Seo1,3, E. Churchman1,4, J. Kiwango1, S. Gervas1, L. Whiddon1
1Support for International Change (SIC), Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania, 2University of Maryland, College Park, Education Policy Studies, College Park, United States, 3University of Michigan, William Davidson Institute, Ann Arbor, United States, 4Emory University, Hubert Department of Global Health, Atlanta, United States
K. Regan, United Republic of Tanzania

17:00
WEAE0303
Abstract
Powerpoint
Mobile phone adherence support for antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the National AIDS Control Program in India?
R. Rodrigues1,2, A. Shet2,3, N. Swaroop4, S. Shastri5, L. Bogg6, A. De Costa2
1St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Community Health, Bangalore, India, 2Karolinska Institutet, Global Health, Stockholm, Sweden, 3St. John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Pediatrics, Bangalore, India, 4St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, HIVIND Project, Bangalore, India, 5Karnataka State AIDS Prevention Society, Bangalore, India, 6School of Sustainable Development of Society and Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
R. Rodrigues, India

17:15
WEAE0304
Abstract
Powerpoint
Mobile telemedicine for improved community-level clinical decision making, referrals and medical information transmission and storage: a pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya
J. Cohn1, K. Xiong2
1University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Philadelphia, United States, 2Moi University, Nairobi, Kenya
J. Cohn, United States

17:30
WEAE0305
Powerpoint
Review on current data on mobile technology


R. Lester, Canada

Powerpoints presentations
The distribution and use of cell phones to mothers of HIV-positive infants identified by the Haiti National Early Infant Diagnosis of HIV program (EID): a model for increasing adherence? - Nathaniel Segaren

Mobile phone adherence support for antiretroviral therapy: what would it cost the National AIDS Control Program in India? - Rashmi Rodrigues

Mobile telemedicine for improved community-level clinical decision making, referrals and medical information transmission and storage: a pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya - Jennifer Cohn
Mobile telemedicine for improved community-level clinical decision making, referrals and medical information transmission and storage: a pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya - Jennifer Cohn
Mobile telemedicine for improved community-level clinical decision making, referrals and medical information transmission and storage: a pilot study in Nairobi, Kenya - Jennifer Cohn

Review on current data on mobile technology - Richard Lester



Rapporteur report

Track E report by Benjamin Chi


WEAE03

Mobile health technologies (mHealth) have generated considerable interest as a means for improving HIV program and patient outcomes. The abstracts in this session examined the cost and feasibility of such approaches and reviewed the current scientific evidence supporting their use.

Nathaniel Segaren and colleagues reported their experience in Haiti with cell phone reminders to improve follow-up of recently diagnosed HIV-infected infants. Mothers responded positively to the enhanced communication (i.e., weekly calls) from health providers. Reported problems included difficulties buying cell phone credits, inconsistent power supply, poor network coverage, and fear of mobile phone theft.

Kati Regan described an SMS-based data entry system to support community follow-up in rural Tanzania. Although community health workers (CHWs) demonstrated an initial preference for the SMS system, by 6 months reportable data was more frequently completed on traditional paper forms. Reasons for this change included dissatisfaction with SMS entry remuneration, user fatigue, and confusion regarding the length of the pilot program.

Rashmi Rodrigues reported costing data for a twice-weekly mHealth intervention (interactive voice response and text-messaging) to support adherence in India. The cost of this intervention was over $2 per patient per year; as the number of patients increased, however, the per-patient cost declined.

Jennifer Cohn reported results from a pilot study in Nairobi to support CHW decision-making during household visits. CHWs were trained to use a mobile phone-based application to assess adherence and screen for drug toxicities. Over the 6-week observation period, a high level of acceptability and satisfaction was reported. Patient trust did not appear to be affected.

The session ended with a state-of-the-art review by Richard Lester. The current scientific evidence supports the use of certain types of SMS reminders to improve patient adherence. While targeted adherence counseling has been shown to improve outcomes, medication reminder alarms have not. Work continues with remote adherence monitoring; however, comparative trials are needed to determine efficacy.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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