XIX International AIDS Conference


MOAB01 HIV and Co-Infections: Co-Enemies
  Oral Abstract Session : Track B
Venue: Session Room 4
Time: 23.07.2012, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Chairs: Constance Benson, United States
Jean Pape, Haiti
 
 

11:00
MOAB0101
Abstract
Powerpoint
Prevalence of hepatitis B co-infection and response to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in urban Tanzania
C. Hawkins1,2, B. Christian2, J. Ye3, T. Nagu4, E. Aris2,4, G. Chalamilla2,3, D. Spiegelman3, F. Mugusi4, S. Mehta5, W. Fawzi2,3
1Northwestern University, Infectious Diseases, Chicago, United States, 2Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania, 3Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, United States, 4Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, United Republic of Tanzania, 5Cornell University, New York, United States
C. Hawkins, United States

11:15
MOAB0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
Cost benefit of integrating cryptococcal antigen screening and preemptive treatment into routine HIV care
D. Meya1,2, R. Rajasingham1, M. Rolfes2, K. Birkenkamp2, D. Boulware2
1Infectious Diseases Institute - Makerere University, Research, Kampala, Uganda, 2Division of Infectious Diseases and International Medicine, University of Minnesota, Department of Medicine, Minneapolis, United States
R. Rajasingham, Uganda

11:30
MOAB0103
Abstract
Powerpoint
Determinants of penicilliosis seasonality in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
P. Bulterys1, T. Le2,3, V.M. Quang4, K. Nelson5, J. Lloyd-Smith6,7
1University of California Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Medical Scientist Training Program, Los Angeles, United States, 2Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Program, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, 3University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hawaii Center for AIDS, Honolulu, United States, 4Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam, 5Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, United States, 6University of California Los Angeles, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Los Angeles, United States, 7National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, United States
P. Bulterys, United States

11:45
MOAB0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphism influence the development of opportunistic diseases in HIV-positive patients
T. Kyrychenko1, G. Dubynska2, T. Koval2, I. Kaidashev2, V. Korshenko1
1Poltava Regional HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Center, Poltava, Ukraine, 2Ukrainian Medical and Dental Academy, Poltava, Ukraine
T. Kyrychenko, Ukraine

12:00
MOAB0105
Powerpoint
Changing epidemiology of OIs in the HAART era


H. Masur, United States

Powerpoints presentations
Prevalence of hepatitis B co-infection and response to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in urban Tanzania - Claudia Hawkins

Cost benefit of integrating cryptococcal antigen screening and preemptive treatment into routine HIV care - Radha Rajasingham

Determinants of penicilliosis seasonality in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam - Philip Bulterys

Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphism influence the development of opportunistic diseases in HIV-positive patients - Tetiana Kyrychenko

Changing epidemiology of OIs in the HAART era - Henry Masur



Rapporteur report

Track B report by Dr. Juergen Rockstroh


Session HIV and Co-Infections: Co-Enemies    11:00 - 12:30    Session room 4  MOAB01

1) The session on coinfections in HIV emphasized that opportunistic infections still play an important role in HIV-disease.

2) In a very large urban cohort from Tanzania a prevalence of HBV was found of 6.2%. A 20% higher risk for mortality was found in dually infected HIV/HBV patients. Moreover, the risk of hepatoxicity was significantly higher in HIV/HBV coinfected patients starting HIV therapy than in HIV-monoinfected subjects. In the next presentation the cost effectiveness of CRAG screening was explored. According to the results the number needed to screen and prevent one death was 15.9 people. The cost of saving one life was less than 40 US$. The authors concluded that targeted CRAG sreening and flucanozole therapy may be cost saving to health care systems and should be integrated into routine HIV care for patients with a CD4<100/µl. In the next paper environmental factors in Vietnam associated with seasonal admissions of P. marneffei infection were assessed. Interestingly, humidity and not rainfall emerged as the most important predictor of penicilliosis admissions which was demonstrated to peak during the most humid months. In the next presentation the presence of the TLR4 Asp299Gly SNP was successfully linked with a greater risk for development of active tuberculosis, bacterial pneumonia, herpes zoster, hairy leukoplakia, toxoplasmosis of brain, and chronic hepatitis C. The clinical role of this marker however, remains to be defined. Finally at the end of the session the changes in epidemiology of opportunistic infections in the US were presented with hepatitis C being listed for the first time among the 10 leading HIV-Associated Hospital Diagnoses. Thrush, pneumonia and PcP also remaining in the list reflecting the late HIV diagnosis in many patients.

3) Comments from the audience addressed in how far the cost modeling on CRAG screening was further substantiated by a prospective study; it was then stated that in deed a validation of the model was currently happening in a prospective study. Moreover, it was stressed how important the continuous training for management of OIs was as indeed knowledge how to diagnose and treat certain OIs was decreasing in many places due to the lower frequency of these diagnosis.

4) OI diagnosis and management skills need to be part of every ID training.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


Contact Us | Site map © 2012 International AIDS Society