XIX International AIDS Conference


MOPDC03 Using Strategic Information to Track Access and Retention in Care
  Oral Poster Discussion Session : Track C
Venue: Mini Room 8
Time: 23.07.2012, 13:00 - 14:00
Co-Chairs: Peter Cherutich, Kenya
Jonathan Mermin, United States
 
 

13:00
MOPDC0301
Abstract
Powerpoint
The United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) provides excellent access to high quality HIV care: results from a national cohort
V. Delpech, Z. Yin, M. Kall, A. Brown
Heatlh Protection Agency, London, United Kingdom
V. Delpech, United Kingdom

13:05
MOPDC0302
Abstract
Powerpoint
Trends in antiretroviral therapy use, HIV RNA plasma viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte counts at death among HIV-positive persons in care in the United States, 2000-2008
K.N. Althoff1, K. Buchacz2, I. Hall2, J. Zhang1, D.B. Hanna1, P. Rebeiro1, S.J. Gange1, R.D. Moore1, M. Kitahata3, K.A. Gebo1, J. Martin4, A.C. Justice5, M. Horberg6, R.S. Hogg7, T.R. Sterling8, A. Cescon7, M.B. Klein9, J. Thorne1, H. Crane3, M.J. Mugavero10, S. Napravnik11, G.D. Kirk1, L.P. Jacobson1, B. Rodriguez12, J.T. Brooks2, North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design
1Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, United States, 2Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, United States, 3University of Washington, Seattle, United States, 4University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, United States, 5Yale University and the VA Connecticut Healthcare System, New Haven, United States, 6Mid-Atlantic Permanente Research Institute, Rockville, United States, 7BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada, 8Vanderbilt University, Nashville, United States, 9McGill University, Montréal, Canada, 10University of Alabama, Birmingham, United States, 11University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, United States, 12Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States
K. Althoff, United States

13:10
MOPDC0303
Abstract
Powerpoint
Linkage, retention, ART use and viral suppression in four large cities in the United States
N. Benbow1, S. Scheer2, A. Wohl3, K. Brady4, A. Gagner1, A. Hughes2, J. Tejero3, M. Eberhart4, V. Hu3, J. Sayles3, S. Townsell1
1Chicago Department of Public Health, Chicago, United States, 2San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, United States, 3Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Los Angeles, United States, 4Philadelphia Department of Public Health, Philadelphia, United States
N. Benbow, United States

13:15
MOPDC0304
Abstract
Powerpoint
Factors associated with achieving viral suppression among newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases in the Washington, D.C.
S. Willis1, A. Castel1, A. Griffin2, T. West2, I. Shaikh2, G. Pappas2
1The George Washington University, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Washington, United States, 2District of Columbia Department of Health, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration, Washington, United States
S. Willis, United States

13:20
MOPDC0305
Abstract
Powerpoint
Patient migration significantly impacts estimates of engagement in HIV care and attainment of an undetectable HIV-RNA level in a cohort of newly HIV-diagnosed individuals
S. Rowan1,2, S. Johnson1, M. Thrun1,2, E. Daniloff3, D. Reirden4, W. Burman1,2, E. Connick1, E. Gardner1,2
1University of Colorado Denver, Division of Infectious Diseases, Denver, United States, 2Denver Public Health, Denver, United States, 3Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Denver, United States, 4The Children's Hospital, Aurora, United States
S. Rowan, United States

13:25
MOPDC0306
Abstract
Powerpoint
Using surveillance data to identify HIV-positive persons out-of-care (OOC) in New York City (NYC) and offer linkage to care and HIV partner services
C.-C. Udeagu, T. Webster-León, A. Bocour, P. Michel, C. Shepard
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Bureau of HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control, Queens, United States
C. Udeagu, United States

13:30
Moderated discussion



Powerpoints presentations
The United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS) provides excellent access to high quality HIV care: results from a national cohort - Valerie Delpech

Trends in antiretroviral therapy use, HIV RNA plasma viral load and CD4 T-lymphocyte counts at death among HIV-positive persons in care in the United States, 2000-2008 - Keri N Althoff

Linkage, retention, ART use and viral suppression in four large cities in the United States - Nanette Benbow

Factors associated with achieving viral suppression among newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS cases in the Washington, D.C. - Sarah Willis

Patient migration significantly impacts estimates of engagement in HIV care and attainment of an undetectable HIV-RNA level in a cohort of newly HIV-diagnosed individuals - Sarah Rowan

Using surveillance data to identify HIV-positive persons out-of-care (OOC) in New York City (NYC) and offer linkage to care and HIV partner services - Chi-Chi Udeagu



Rapporteur report

Track C report by Audrey Pettifor


Early diagnosis of HIV, prompt access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retention in care are critical in ensuring optimal care for HIV patients.  Data was presented on linkage to  and retention in HIV Care from a number of settings in the UK and US. Data presented from the UK National Health System (NHS) found that in 2010 half of newly diagnosed cases were diagnosed late (CD4< 350 per mm3) however, once individuals were diagnosed, engagement in care and viral load suppression were good, regardless of patient characteristics. Data presented from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) 2000 to 2008, found that the percentage of participants using combination ART increased 10% (p< 0.01) and suppressed HIV VL (≤2.7 log10copies/mL) increased from 26% (p< 0.01). HIV case surveillance data four cities in the US found that the proportion of newly-diagnosed persons linked to, on treatment and virologically suppressed was significantly higher in LA and SF compared to Chicago and Philadelphia. Across all cities, a higher percentage of Whites compared to Blacks were on ART and were virally suppressed. Data from the District of Columbia Department of Health (DCDOH) found those linked to care within 3 months were more likely to achieve viral suppression and those with 2 or more VL tests per year were more likely to be suppressed stressing the importance of engagement in care. The New York City health department implemented a program to trace patients who were identified as out of care between 2008 and 2010, of those that were traced (689/787), 60% were out of care, but of these, 79% accepted appointments and 72% returned to care. Health department-based outreach initiatives utilizing surveillance registries can successfully re-engage patients who are out of care. 




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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