XIX International AIDS Conference


MOGS05 Communicating Complex Science in 140 Characters: Social Media and the HIV Prevention Research Field
  GV Workshop
Venue: GV Session Room 2
Time: 23.07.2012, 15:00 - 16:30
Level: Foundation

Target audience: Advocate, Community-based researcher

Seating Limits: 160
Facilitator: Kay Marshall, United States
 
 
In 2011, 'HIV' was tweeted more than 800,000 times. Social media has become a major communications tool that cannot be ignored in planning communications strategies for HIV programmes. Savvy HIV advocates can maximize their effectiveness by utilizing social media platforms including blogs, Facebook and Twitter to communicate about programmes and issues and to find out what others are saying. However, understanding these platforms and how advocates can best harness the power of social media to enact change can be challenging. This workshop will draw on the results of a survey on HIV prevention communications and social media completed in early 2012. Participants will leave with concrete ideas on how to use social media to advance their issue or organization, a list of key HIV prevention research social media mavens to follow and a strategy for tracking what others are saying about relevant issues.

15:00
MOGS0501
Introduction



15:05
MOGS0502
Powerpoint
Building support for global and national advocacy networks through social media


J. Pickett, United States
V. Jones, United States

15:15
MOGS0503
Powerpoint
Using social media in clinical trials: recruitment and information sharing


J. Maynard, United States

15:25
MOGS0504
Powerpoint
What are they tweeting? Tracking your issue on Twitter, Facebook and beyond


K. Marshall, United States

15:35
MOGS0505
Powerpoint
To post or not to post? Factors in creating your new media strategy


V. Blaser, United States
A. Ragsdale, United States

15:45
MOGS0506
Questions and answers



16:25
MOGS0507
Closing remarks



Powerpoints presentations
Building support for global and national advocacy networks through social media -

Using social media in clinical trials: recruitment and information sharing -

What are they tweeting? Tracking your issue on Twitter, Facebook and beyond - Kay Marshall

To post or not to post? Factors in creating your new media strategy -



Rapporteur report

GV report by Waggaman Christina


“Communicating Complex Science in a 140 Characters: Social Media and the HIV Prevention Research Field” discussed how the Internet is a tool for HIV prevention, focusing on the role of social networking sites. The National Black Gay Men’s Advocacy coalition described how a survey they conducted on how information channels are used among black, gay men in the United States confirmed their belief that the internet was crucial to communicating their messages. In order to receive information about advocacy and policy updates for HIV 59% of their respondents reported using e-mail, 56% said they used social networks, and 39% logged on to websites. Additionally 95% of respondents reported using Facebook new in their everyday life and 41% reported using Twitter. The International Rectal Microbicides Advocates attributed their success as an organization largely to social media, and gave tips on ways this technology to reach target audiences. They suggested keeping messages simple and to provide links instead of attempting to explain to more detailed, using attention-grabbing graphics, and balancing regular communications with subscribers without inundating them with too many messages. The HTVN 505, an HIV vaccine efficacy trial discussed the use of social media as necessary for recruitment in clinical trials. They reported that 31% of their participants had been recruited through social media platforms. Lastly, The Global Advocacy for HIV prevention explained how to better engaged in HIV advocacy issues through social media. They asserted that for HIV/AIDS advocates, social media was important not only for gaining access to peers and news sources, but also for understanding the viewpoints of those who disagree with their causes. The take-home message of this session was that social networking has become a fundamental part of American daily life, and therefore it is essential for HIV prevention organizations to integrate it into their communication strategy.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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