XIX International AIDS Conference


MOWS10 Speak Up! How to Go Viral... Safely: HIV-positive People and Advocates Using the Media for Change
  Community Skills Development
Venue: Mini Room 4
Time: 23.07.2012, 14:30 - 18:00
Language:           English

Level:                  Intermediate

Target audience: Advocate, Media, Community-based journalist

Seating limits:    50
Co-Facilitators: Sonia Rastogi, United States
Kellee Terrell, United States
Olivia Ford, United States
 
 
Throughout the vibrant legacy of the HIV movement, the media has been a tool to hold decision-makers accountable and instigate change. With rapidly changing economic and health care systems, it is critical for communities to frame how to turn the tide. Today, people living with HIV (PLHIV) and advocates are led to create their own media. User driven-blogs and online petitions can push a local issue into the global spotlight in hours. Speak Up! is designed to help participants frame their issue by refining their public speaking, social media, video blogging and viral publishing skills. Led by PLHIV and grassroots media experts, this interactive workshop gives participants a space to practice public speaking, brainstorm a social media strategy, and develop a video blog to name a few activities. The workshop is designed to support the efforts of PLHIV, however all conference participants are welcome.

14:30
MOWS1001
Powerpoint
Welcome and introductions


S. Rastogi, United States

14:45
MOWS1002
Powerpoint
Expert media panel


K. Bhardwaj, India
S. Rastogi, United States
O. Ford, United States
B. Seti, Namibia
S. Petretti, United Kingdom
M. King, United States

15:45
MOWS1003
Skills-building break-out sessions


K. Bhardwaj, India
M. Mejia, United States
O. Ford, United States
B. Seti, Namibia
S. Petretti, United Kingdom
M. King, United States
K. Terrell, United States

16:45
MOWS1004
Creative activity


O. Ford, United States

17:15
MOWS1005
Closing



Powerpoints presentations
Welcome and introductions - Sonia Rastogi

Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -
Expert media panel -



Rapporteur report

CPC report by Laurel Sprague


This workshop was designed to give PLHIV and advocates the tools needed to frame the epidemic and our issues in our own voices, presented by people living with HIV and advocates from around the world who work in grassroots and new media: Sonia Rastogi, U.S. Positive Women’s Network; Boniswa Seti, AIDS Rights Alliance of Southern Africa; Kellee Terrell and Olivia Ford, theBody.com; Kajal Bhardwaj, Indian lawyer and advocate for just intellectual property regulations; Mark S. King, U.S. blogger; Maria Mejia, U.S. blogger; and Silvia Petretti, Positively UK.

Rastogi opened the workshop by describing a human rights framework for media work; one which focuses on questions of rights, such as the rights needed for people to protect themselves from HIV or to make treatment decisions. This was followed by a panel discussion, moderated by Terrell, about panelists’ motivations for engaging in HIV media work, experiences, and strategies for getting stories heard and protecting against being tokenized by mainstream media reporters. Panelists described commitments to social justice, the practical need to work with reporters to get attention to HIV issues, and the desire to share information for and with people living with HIV.

Bhardwaj described a successful campaign by people living with HIV and advocates across Asia to gain global media attention to the complex issue of intellectual property restrictions. Using creative new media tactics combined with mobilization of increasing numbers of people living with HIV, they were able to gain global media coverage and, ultimately, convince the Indian government to promise to not trade away rights to generic medications in EU trade agreements.

King argued that communities and advocates cannot necessarily stop or change the tidal waves of stories about us in the mainstream news; therefore, blogging and new media are important for getting the stories across in our own words. Ford reminded the audience that human beings are behind every media institution and Terrell described the toll that funding cuts have taken on expertise related to health in newsrooms. Seti, followed by a number of other panelists, encouraged the audience to create strong relationships with reporters to help them to understand the issues and to gain support for sharing community stories.

Panelists and audience members addressed the blame and victim/perpetrator storylines common in mainstream reports about HIV, coming up with a variety of strategies for responding. These included focusing on shared responsibility and connecting responses to larger issues, such as lack of prevention education. Petretti made a compelling statement of the connections between the social inequities experienced by women and women’s vulnerability to HIV infection, demonstrating a way to shift from a story of individual blame to a rights-based framework.

Terrell ended the panel by stressing the importance of people living with HIV and working in AIDS Service Organizations to recognize where our expertise does and does not lie, and to educate ourselves on the issues to ensure that we do not perpetuate misinformation.  

The second half of the workshop was devoted to skills-building sessions on developing media campaigns, framing personal and community messages, blogging and social media, and video blogging. 




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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