XIX International AIDS Conference


WERE01 Regional Session Connecting the Dots: HIV and AIDS in the Context of the Black Diaspora
  Regional Session
Venue: Session Room 5
Time: 25.07.2012, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Chairs: Winnie Sseruma, United Kingdom
Wangari Tharao, Canada
 
 
The number of people of African descent living outside of Africa is estimated at 140 million, most living in the Western Hemisphere. When looking at rates of new HIV infections across many high-income countries, Black Diaspora (BD) populations are often disproportionately affected, creating a disturbing global pattern of common disadvantage and inequity. This breakthrough session will explore research, policy, prevention, advocacy and programmatic themes within a GIPA context, with a focus on priorities and action plans, to address the need for a coordinated global HIV framework for BD populations. Presenters will 'connect the dots' to ensure that the experiences of BD populations are not seen in isolation, but rather as an interconnected phenomenon that warrants greater and immediate global attention.
Webcast provided by The Kaiser Family Foundation

11:00
Introduction



11:05
WERE0101
Powerpoint
Webcast
Understanding HIV in the context of the Black Diaspora: an epidemiological based framework


K. Fenton, United States

11:20
WERE0102
Powerpoint
Webcast
Global perspectives on optimizing HIV prevention in the context of the Black Diaspora: needs, gaps, solutions


A. Fakoya, Switzerland

11:35
WERE0103
Powerpoint
Webcast
Afro-Latin women and HIV in Latin America: addressing social, political and historical impacts of racism on the sustainability of grassroots networks


J. Werneck, Brazil

11:50
WERE0104
Powerpoint
Webcast
Living with HIV as a migrant woman in the diaspora: negotiating multiple spaces


M. Muchenje, Canada

12:05
WERE0105
Powerpoint
Sustaining a global platform for action: knowledge sharing and network development across the Black Diaspora


S. Mabuwa, Australia

12:20
Questions, answers and conclusion



Powerpoints presentations
Understanding HIV in the context of the Black Diaspora: an epidemiological based framework - Kevin Fenton

Global perspectives on optimizing HIV prevention in the context of the Black Diaspora: needs, gaps, solutions - Ade Fakoya

Afro-Latin women and HIV in Latin America: addressing social, political and historical impacts of racism on the sustainability of grassroots networks - Jurema Werneck

Living with HIV as a migrant woman in the diaspora: negotiating multiple spaces - Marvelous Muchenje

Sustaining a global platform for action: knowledge sharing and network development across the Black Diaspora - Sem Mabuwa



Rapporteur report

CPC report by Memory Sachikonye


This was the first ever session on the Black Diaspora (BD) in the history of IAS. The number of people of African descent living outside of Africa is estimated at 140 million, most living in the Western Hemisphere. When looking at rates of new HIV infections across many high-income countries, BD populations are often disproportionately affected, creating a disturbing global pattern of common disadvantage and inequity.

 

This breakthrough session explored research, policy, prevention, advocacy and programmatic themes within a GIPA context, with a focus on priorities and action plans, to address the need for a coordinated global HIV framework for BD populations. Presenters 'connected the dots' to ensure that the experiences of BD populations are not seen in isolation, but rather as an interconnected phenomenon that warrants greater and immediate global attention. An epidemiology of HIV rates among the BD showed the high rates among within Europe and USA. Experiences were shared from Canada, Brazil and Australia to demonstrate the issues people face when they migrate. Brazil highlighted the elements for change as empowering women and the BD communities; fighting racism and making public HIV policy.

 

The aim is to get HIV infections in the BD population to zero. Gaps identified were:

·         Lack of clear information for the BD population about services available to them.

·         Lack of standardization of care.

·         Inconsistent policies that differ in the way migrants are treated

·         Obstacles at service delivery that are barriers to prevention, care and treatment.

 

To get to zero, the meeting called for:

·         Measuring the epidemic - if it’s not measured, it can’t be prevented. Understanding the prevalence better will help address the issues.

·         Financing of programs that work with BD populations on prevention, care and support.

·         Coordination of services to meet the needs of the BD population in each region.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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