XIX International AIDS Conference


MOSA05 Using Mobile Technologies to Eliminate Pediatric HIV
  Non-Commercial Satellite
Venue: Mini Room 3
Time: 23.07.2012, 07:00 - 08:30
Chair: William Philbrick, United States
Organiser: Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation, mHealth Alliance, and Johnson & Johnson
 
 
The goal of this session is to showcase evidence-based mHealth solutions that improve prevention of vertical transmission results. Global efforts to eliminate new infections of HIV in children by 2015 and reduce maternal deaths are showing signs of success. Prevention of vertical transmission efforts utilize a cascade of services during pregnancy, childbirth and breast-feeding to diminish the risk of HIV transmission and to promote the health of mothers and babies. However, there are a number of critical points along this cascade where breakdowns occur, such as insufficient access to/utilization of services, losses to follow-up and suboptimal adherence to treatment and prophylaxis regimens. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the use of mobile phone technologies can help address key gaps along the PMTCT cascade. The session will demonstrate how gaps can be reduced or eliminated through mobile technology (mHealth) solutions.

07:00
Introduction


W. Philbrick, United States

07:10

Powerpoint
The State of the Evidence for Using Mobile Phone Technology for Improving PMTCT (vertical transmission) Results: The Elimination of New Pediatric Infections of HIV and Keeping Mothers Alive


W. Philbrick, United States

07:22

Powerpoint
Using mobile phone technology to improve antenatal and PMTCT service uptake in Kenya


S. Kassaye, Kenya

07:34

Powerpoint
Programme Mwana - Leveraging Mobile Technology to Strengthen Health Services for Women and Children in Rural and Underserved Areas


M. Schaefer, United States

07:36

Powerpoint
Addressing obstacles to laboratory testing in PMTCT programs: Kenya's EID "ecosystem"


S. Essajee, United States

07:58

Powerpoint
Panel Discussion and Q&A


W. Philbrick, United States
S. Kassaye, Kenya
M. Schaefer, United States
S. Essajee, United States

Powerpoints presentations
The State of the Evidence for Using Mobile Phone Technology for Improving PMTCT (vertical transmission) Results: The Elimination of New Pediatric Infections of HIV and Keeping Mothers Alive - William Philbrick

Using mobile phone technology to improve antenatal and PMTCT service uptake in Kenya - Seble Kassaye

Programme Mwana - Leveraging Mobile Technology to Strengthen Health Services for Women and Children in Rural and Underserved Areas - Merrick Schaefer

Addressing obstacles to laboratory testing in PMTCT programs: Kenya's EID "ecosystem" - Shaffiq Essajee

Panel Discussion and Q&A -



Rapporteur report

Youth report by Kimberly Atkins


As mobile coverage expands, particularly in developing countries, utilizing mobile technologies to improve health outcomes (mHEALTH) has become practical and efficacious, particularly in the areas of HIV and reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH).

mHEALTH has been utilized to promote service delivery to HIV positive mothers throughout the continuum of care (ie antenatal, labor and delivery and postnatal stages). A Randomized Control Trial (RCT) study conducted in Zanzibar among 1200 women showed that when mobile phones were utilized women were 41% more likely to attend all four antenatal visits compared to only 24% in the control group. mHEALTH has also proven successful in promoting treatment adherence, exclusive breastfeeding, immunizations and family planning. World Vision conducted a study concluding mobile technology increased the capacity of midwives to handle more complicated birthing cases.

mHEALTH is currently being utilized in a cluster randomized control study in the Kenyan province of Nyanza with the goal of promoting better communication between health care providers and patients and providing greater support to women throughout their pregnancy/postpartum. SMS messages cover a broad range of topics relating to drug adherence, nutrition, birth planning and messages of hope. Preliminary findings show women are hesitant to enroll in the trial, many citing not having their own phone as a reason, and male partner involvement being low. An audience member suggested that the study use caution in ensuring confidentiality/anonymity when sending SMS messages relating to HIV status.

Program Mwana utilizes mobile technology to assist in early infant diagnoses of HIV (EID). Mwana utilizes two software programs, one of which is health system focused and aims to train clinic staff and the other is community focused, aiming to train Community Health Workers (CHW). CHW are able to register new child births via Mwana’s mHEALTH/SMS system. Mwana also can be used to send HIV test results (only accessible via a pin code) and proven to improve the turn-around time for receiving results by 56%.

 

 




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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