XIX International AIDS Conference


TUSA07 Everything You Have Ever Wanted to Know About Pleasurable Safer Sex but Were Too Afraid to Ask
  Non-Commercial Satellite
Venue: Mini Room 7
Time: 24.07.2012, 07:00 - 08:30
Chair: Anne Philpott, India
Organiser: The Pleasure Project, India and UK; with DKT International and DKT Brazil
 
 
In ignoring pleasure, the HIV/AIDS community is ignoring one of its most potent prevention tools. Our satellite will bring pleasure & desire into the realms of safer sex by showing how one of the primary motivations for having sex "pursuit of pleasure" can improve receptiveness to safer sex messages. We will launch a new evidence review "20 questions on Sex, Pleasure and Health" which answers questions such as "Why do people have sex?" to "How can safer sex skills be communicated?". The Pleasure Project builds bridges between the pleasure/sex industry and the safer sex world by avoiding negativity, and by ensuring that erotic materials include examples of safer sex, and that sexual health materials include pleasure as a key element. DKT International is one of the largest private providers of family planning and reproductive health products and services in the developing world and uses positive incentives to promote safer sex.

07:00
Introduction


A. Philpott, India

07:05
Early Morning Appetizers - We'll have coffee and snacks - so start your day watching some sexy safer sex films before the formal session starts at 7:30am.



07:35

Powerpoint
Eroticizing Safer Sex Improves Emerging Adults' Sexual Health: A Meta-Analysis


L. Scott-Sheldon, United States

07:45

Powerpoint
How Pleasure Has Succeeded in Creating Lifestyle Behaviors and Increasing Condom Use


C. Purdy, United States

07:55

Powerpoint
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil


D. Marun, Brazil

08:05
"Active lust seekers": Sexual pleasure and the pre-marital sexual adventures of young women in Southern Africa


T. Masvawure, Zimbabwe

08:15
Pleasure, Passion, Pulchritude, Sex, and Technology: HIV prevention is about to get even messier.


G. Dowsett, Australia

Powerpoints presentations
Eroticizing Safer Sex Improves Emerging Adults' Sexual Health: A Meta-Analysis - Lori A. J. Scott-Sheldon

How Pleasure Has Succeeded in Creating Lifestyle Behaviors and Increasing Condom Use - Chris Purdy
How Pleasure Has Succeeded in Creating Lifestyle Behaviors and Increasing Condom Use - Chris Purdy

Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun
Promoting Condoms with Pleasure: the 'Prudence' Experience in Brazil - Daniel Marun



Rapporteur report

Youth report by James Gray


TUSA07 Everything You Have Ever Wanted to Know About Pleasurable Safer Sex but Were Too Afraid to Ask

This session focused on pleasure as one of the aspects of HIV prevention that is not given enough attention.

Condom companies have been using pleasure to sell condoms as the risk and safety messages have not been effective. Much of the advertising is currently focused on men as the initiator and driver of condom use. The greater range of condoms available can contribute to increasing and maintaining condom use by giving people more options to find one that maximizes their pleasure. A concern was expressed by an audience member that these advertisements objectified women. The speaker disagreed but acknowledged that there was a delicate balance between utilizing ‘sex sells’ and being respectful.

A meta-analysis of research about erotizing safe sex found these interventions were successful at reducing risky sexual behaviors, however, only a limited number of studies and interventions were available to assess. Beyond access issues, there are many reasons that condoms are not used including loss of sexual pleasure and intimacy, and association with disease. While many people advocate for a greater acknowledgement of pleasure, it rarely happens and not with those that need it the most.

A common narrative about unmarried young women in southern Africa is that they are not interested in sex and are abstinent unless someone is pressuring or forcing them to have sex. A recent qualitative study challenges this narrative and describes young women who are actively seeking sexual experiences and pleasure. It is important to acknowledge that young women have sexual agency and aren’t necessarily ‘victims’ of men’s pursuit of pleasure.

Often within the HIV sector sex is reduced down to very specific behaviors, divorced from personal, social and cultural influences. What sex means to different individuals and groups of people has an immense impact on their decision making and reducing sex to a simple behavior with an associated risk of HIV misses crucial aspects of this interaction. Emerging technologies, such as microbicides, will not be effective without understanding the way that sex is negotiated and improvised.




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.


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